best wine for lasagna Lasagne is an all-time favorite amongst the tough competition of Italian foods. We think that it’s even better with the right glass of wine. What isn’t? 

Lasagne’s multitude of flavors from its layers of pasta, béchamel, and beef can make it difficult to pair with wine. Often topped off with a good sprinkling of parmesan cheese. You’ll need a wine with a good level of acidity to cut through all of those different sauces, textures, and flavors. And let’s not forget that there are different styles of lasagne too!

Whether you’re making or ordering a classical lasagne al forno with meat, or for (not just) vegetarians, perhaps a creamy mushroom or ricotta version. It’s still a beautifully rich dish.

Comparison Table

PRODUCT FEATURES LATEST PRICE
1. Marchesi di Barolo Ruvei Barbera d’Alba 2017

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  • Variety: Barbera and Nebbiolo, Italian Red
  • Appellation: Barolo, Piedmont
  • Winery: Ruvei
  • Alcohol: 13.5%
  • Bottle Size: 750 ml
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2. Stephane Aviron Côte de Brouilly Vieilles Vignes Cru du Beaujolais 2017

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  • Variety: 100% Gamay, French Red
  • Appellation: Beaujolais, Burgundy
  • Winery: Stéphane Aviron
  • Alcohol: 13.5%
  • Bottle: 750 ml
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3. Reata Sonoma Coast Rosé 2018

Reata Sonoma Coast Rosé 2018
  • Variety: Pinot Noir, Californian Rose
  • Appellation: Sonoma Coast, Northern California
  • Winery: Reata
  • Alcohol: 13.5%
  • Bottle Size: 750 ml
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4. Felsina I Sistri Berardenga Chardonnay 2017

Felsina I Sistri Berardenga Chardonnay 2017
  • Variety: Chardonnay, Italian White
  • Appellation: Tuscany, Italy
  • Winery: Felsina
  • Alcohol: 13.5%
  • Bottle: 750 ml
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5. Oddero Barbera d’Alba Superiore 2018

Oddero Barbera d'Alba Superiore 2018
  • Variety: Barbera, Italian Red
  • Appellation: Barbera d’Alba, Piedmont
  • Winery: Oddero
  • Alcohol: 14.5%
  • Bottle Size: 750 ml
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6. Cavallotto Vigna Scot Dolcetto d’Alba 2018

Cavallotto Vigna Scot Dolcetto d'Alba 2018
  • Variety: Dolcetto, Italian Red
  • Appellation: Vigna Scot, Piedmont
  • Winery: Cavallotto
  • Alcohol: 12.5%
  • Bottle Size: 750 ml
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Which styles of wines pair best? After all, beef lasagne calls for a ripe, juicy red. Whereas, with a vegetarian version that would be too overwhelming. For that something like a Chardonnay could be the one. Whichever one it is, you’ll want to avoid too high tannins and too much oak. However, also be wary of going too light

To help you, we’ve researched, chosen, and tasted what we believe to be the best.

Our Best Wine for Lasagna Reviews and Comparisons

1. Marchesi di Barolo Ruvei Barbera d’Alba 2017


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Product Highlights

Made partly with Nebbiolo grapes too, the aromatics and acid-tannin structure are even more delightful than a single varietal Barolo. It’s not surprising that it’s one of Italy’s most-loved reds.

Suitably rich and full alongside lasagne, this well-balanced and perfectly blended. The oakiness is right on the money, and the tartness slight enough to complement the aromatics and flavors. 

Features 

  • Variety: Barbera and Nebbiolo, Italian Red
  • Appellation: Barolo, Piedmont
  • Winery: Ruvei
  • Alcohol: 13.5%
  • Bottle Size: 750 ml 

What We Like About Marchesi di Barolo Ruvei Barbera d’Alba 2017

This is another Barbera of gorgeous ruby-red color with purple shades. The fragrances are fruity with the jam of red fruit and darker berries. Freshness comes from the creamy vanilla and toasted hazelnut. 

What We Don’t Like About Marchesi di Barolo Ruvei Barbera d’Alba 2017

It’s not quite as fully in the body as our first Barbera selection, and we’ve not quite decided about the balance of tannins and acidity. Both may come with more time

PROS

  • Dry, earthy, and smooth 
  • Place in the middle of the table and let everyone help themselves

CONS

  • The fruit needs to be more dominant 

2. Felsina I Sistri Berardenga Chardonnay 2017

Felsina I Sistri Berardenga Chardonnay 2017

Product Highlights

They produce great whites in Italy too, especially in Tuscany where this Chardonnay is classed as an Indicazione Geografica Typica Toscana, or a typical geographic representation of the region. The 28,000 bottles that were produced might sound a lot, but this vintage sells fast as it is rated better than any other year for this wine.

Pairing wines with vegetarian lasagne naturally depends on the filling. But any variations with cream, ricotta, or mushrooms, and not tomato sauce, needs a white that has a little bit of weight as well as oak. Felsina I Sistri Berardenga Chardonnay 2017 is just that.

Features 

  • Variety: Chardonnay, Italian White
  • Appellation: Tuscany, Italy
  • Winery: Felsina
  • Alcohol: 13.5%
  • Bottle: 750 ml 

What We Like About Felsina I Sistri Berardenga Chardonnay 2017 

The vibrant straw-yellow color hosts tropical fruit and peach with hints of toasted spice and vanilla on the nose. On the palate, apricot, peach, lemon, and vanilla, are complemented just enough by accents of butterscotch, sweet custard cream, and pastry crust from the oak. 

It’s full and creamy. An elegant white whose fine tannins are well-balanced by the acidity to support the freshness of those flavors. 

What We Don’t Like About Felsina I Sistri Berardenga Chardonnay 2017

Even its creaminess can’t quite soften the slightly rough edges

PROS

  • The color of liquid gold
  • Fruity, rich, and complex

CONS

  • Buttery and oily

3. Stephane Aviron Côte de Brouilly Vieilles Vignes Cru du Beaujolais 2017


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Product Highlights 

Let’s move from Italy to France, another nation that knows and loves its food and wine.

This is a Gamay, a frequently underrated grape, but another ripe, juicy, and fresh red. Especially these, sourced from vines that are more than half-a-century old considered the finest in Beaujolais villages. That’s down to the favorable southwest-facing terroir of clay and limestone.

Features 

  • Variety: 100% Gamay, French Red
  • Appellation: Beaujolais, Burgundy
  • Winery: Stéphane Aviron
  • Alcohol: 13.5%
  • Bottle: 750 ml 

What We Like About Stephane Aviron Côte de Brouilly Vieilles Vignes Cru du Beaujolais 2017

This wine is characterized by its elegance, finesse, and roundness. Aromas of cherries, raspberries, and peonies lead into a very good concentration of rich red and dark berry fruit, with a touch of spice. It has a soft and succulent texture of melting tannins and ripe acids. 

We love the winery’s sustainable viticulture, extremely old vines, and the classical techniques of Burgundy.

What We Don’t Like About Stephane Aviron Côte de Brouilly Vieilles Vignes Cru du Beaujolais 2017 

We’ve had better 2017 Beaujolais Gamays from Stephane Aviron too. But sadly, they’re not available.  

PROS

  • The marriage of tradition and imagination
  • Accessible and delicious, it drinks well now

CONS

  • Good but not great

4. Reata Sonoma Coast Rosé 2018 

Reata Sonoma Coast Rosé 2018 See Related Topic: Best Wine For Bolognese Sauce

Product Highlights 

Away from the reds now, and Rosé can also offer a good amount of acidity to stand up to a rich lasagne.

The excellent Sonoma County growing conditions for Pinot Noir grapes led to an especially good harvest in 2018. The result was this gorgeous Reata Rosé, of light and refreshing acidity. This makes it a good match for vegetarian versions, as well as the classic meat lasagne.  

Features 

  • Variety: Pinot Noir, Californian Rose
  • Appellation: Sonoma Coast, Northern California
  • Winery: Reata
  • Alcohol: 13.5%
  • Bottle Size: 750 ml  

What We Like About Reata Sonoma Coast Rosé 2018

Open a bottle of this elegant Rosé of Pinot Noir, and it transforms into. First, we were struck by the floral aromas that swirl out of the glass. Then by the sweet flavors of sweet red cherries and strawberries, with more notes of grapefruit, guava, and pineapple.  

But it’s not all about the fruit. This a dry Rosé with a slightly chalky texture, and the right balance of tannins and acidity. 

What We Don’t Like About Reata Sonoma Coast Rosé 2018 

It’s a personal preference as always, but it may be slightly too dry and bitter for some tastes.  

PROS

  • Crispy fruit
  • Good for drinking on its own nice fruity flavor and crisp

CONS

  • Soft and commercial

5. Oddero Barbera d’Alba Superiore 2018

Oddero Barbera d'Alba Superiore 2018

Product Highlights

Of course, it’s natural to start in the country of the dish itself. A Barbera from Italy is exactly what we need, as a fresh yet juicy wine.

This one is from Oddero, a historic and traditional family-owned Barolo house. And after over 300 years, still one of the best. Robert Parker, Jr.’s Wine Advocate awarded 92 points to their Barbera d’Alba Superiore 2018. 

With soft tannins in the mouth and pleasing acidity, it’s a classic Barbera to go with the classic dish of lasagne al forno. That balance though, makes it versatile to pair with plenty else.    

Features 

  • Variety: Barbera, Italian Red
  • Appellation: Barbera d’Alba, Piedmont
  • Winery: Oddero
  • Alcohol: 14.5%
  • Bottle Size: 750 ml 

What We Like About Oddero Barbera d’Alba Superiore 2018

You’ll be seduced thanks to its richness and smoothness from the first sip. Dark and red fruits and berries are abundant, with just the right amount of peppery spice, smoky tar, and mineral freshness. The fine balance of tannins and acidity, we’ve already written about above, but they’re well-worth mentioning again. 

This should be served at room temperature any time from now until the end of 2025. 

What We Don’t Like About Oddero Barbera d’Alba Superiore 2018

We wanted to truly love this, but it lacked a bit of depth and was slightly more acidic than we were expecting.

PROS

  • The beautiful color of ruby-red color with a purple tinge
  • Great food wine

CONS

  • Didn’t open up as hoped

6. Cavallotto Vigna Scot Dolcetto d’Alba 2018

Cavallotto Vigna Scot Dolcetto d'Alba 2018

Product Highlights

Our final Italian red is this Piedmontese Dolcetto. Ready to drink now, but with the promise of aging potential for another 5 years.

Dense and creamy, but not too oaky for lasagne. That’s because it was only in the oak of large Slavonian barrels for 6 months, and then a further 6 months in cement tanks. 

Features 

  • Variety: Dolcetto, Italian Red
  • Appellation: Vigna Scot, Piedmont 
  • Winery: Cavallotto
  • Alcohol: 12.5%
  • Bottle Size: 750 ml 

What We Like About Cavallotto Vigna Scot Dolcetto d’Alba 2018

Medium-structured and soft with the recognizable Dolcetta nose of cherries and other dark fruits. 

Complexity, and enough intensity, come from the earthy undertones, clear minerality, for a very lovely balance. 

What We Don’t Like About About Cavallotto Vigna Scot Dolcetto d’Alba 2018 

Not showing well enough yet, it’s another that would benefit from time.

PROS

  • Very soft but hearty
  • A lingering finish melts into the lovely aftertaste

CONS

  • The alcohol is (ever so slightly) rough

FINAL VERDICT 

The beautifully rich dish of lasagne, both the traditional meat version and a lesser so vegetarian one, cries out for the right wine pairing.

Having selected, tasted, and reviewed plenty of contenders, our choice for the best wine for lasagne is Oddero Barbera d’Alba Superiore 2018.

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